Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Sign-and-trade’

Clearing Up Some Sign-and-Trade Confusion

July 9th, 2010 3 comments
Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookEmail this to someone

The following was reported today in the South Florida Sun Sentinel:

Should the Heat be able to pull off the maneuver, it would give Heat President Pat Riley unlimited resources to re-sign remaining current Heat free agents such as Udonis Haslem, Dorell Wright and Quentin Richardson — whichever are not included in such a sign-and-trade — without having to make those agreements work within the confines of the NBA’s “soft” salary cap.

In addition, such a maneuver would allow the Heat to retain its mid-level salary-cap exception for 2010-11, which it then could utilize to complete its planned signing of Washington Wizards free-agent swingman Mike Miller.

For the benefit of any dual readers who would certainly be confused and prematurely excited, allow me to clarify exactly why this scenario is impossible.

Read more…

Chris Bosh narrows his list to five

May 21st, 2010 1 comment
Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookEmail this to someone

Chris Bosh has narrowed his sign-and-trade list to four teams, including the Miami Heat

Chris Bosh has been rumored to have informed the Toronto Raptors that he’s narrowed his list of preferred destinations in free agency to five (of course, he’s denying it).

The list – which includes the Chicago Bulls, Los Angeles Lakers, Miami Heat and New York Knicks, in addition to Toronto – was reportedly given to management in order for the Raptors to pursue a sign-and-trade deal.

That Bosh has selected to narrow the list to these five teams should hardly be surprising. Why?

  • Bosh is clearly motivated by the potential to make maximum dollars. By either signing with the Raptors or pursuing a sign-and-trade transaction, he would take full advantage of the additional $29.4 million in salary his Bird rights would afford versus signing with an organization as an unrestricted free agent.
  • Bosh is steadfastly keeping it as one of his top priorities to play for a winner. The Lakers are sure to be perennial championship contenders, while the Bulls and the Heat are both building toward that same goal.
  • Bosh will keep a keen eye on the whereabouts of LeBron James. LeBron is rumored to be most interested in the Knicks, Bulls and Heat. Each has the capability, with varying degrees of roster maneuvering, to sign both to maximum contracts.

If – or perhaps more accurately when – Bosh leaves, the Raptors will be looking to work out a sign-and-trade transaction. The Raptors will not get a player equal to the skill of Chris Bosh. Owner Brian Colangelo will, however, do everything within his power to maximize Bosh’s return value. Read more…

Categories: Commentary Tags: ,

Interesting Developments in Grizzlie-land

May 16th, 2010 No comments
Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookEmail this to someone

In what is perhaps some small measure of vindication for Heat president Pat Riley, Memphis has invited undersized 6’4″ shooting guard O.J. Mayo to participate in their summer league. The goal for Mayo would be to improve his point guard skills. Mayo’s shaky ball handling and poor decision-making have been major deficiencies throughout his first N.B.A. two seasons.

If you recall, Riley gave serious consideration to drafting Mayo with the second overall pick in the 2008 N.B.A. draft, before ultimately selecting Michael Beasley.

Draft analysts automatically assumed Beasley and Derrick Rose would go with the first and second picks in the draft. Many even considered Beasley to be the more talented. Mayo was therefore viewed as being a reach with the second overall pick at the time. Riley, however, had visions of turning Mayo into a point guard, in order to create a dynamic backcourt pairing with Dwyane Wade. The Heat needed (and continue to need) outside shooting, and using the second pick on Mayo could have added a ton of it. It was felt that Mayo could tee off from deep while Wade drove hard to the basket. Mayo also had the ability to create his own shot at will. Ultimately, Riley did not see enough to upend the more popular selection.

Mayo was then drafted with the third overall pick by the Memphis Grizzlies.

While Riley’s assessment of Mayo’s point guard skills appears to have been proven correct thus far into his N.B.A. career, the unexpected gem at the position appears to have come in the fourth spot in the draft, where the Seattle Supersonics – the Oklahoma City Thunder predecessor – selected Russell Westbrook. Westbrook has yet to develop a reliable outside shot, but his contributions in all other phases of the game have him as a sure-fire perennial all-star. However, without the ability to space the floor, even Westbrook may not have produced a quality backcourt pairing for Wade. In fact, no other 2008 draftee has shown the backcourt skills that would cause one to second guess Riley’s decision to draft in the frontcourt. While the frontcourt selection can certainly be second guessed, namely due to the superb play of 7’0″ center Brook Lopez, Beasley was widely considered the wise choice at the time.

Now just two years later, questions abound as to whether the Heat should, or even could, abandon its attempts to further develop Beasley and trade him.

Ironically, the answer to Beasley’s fate could once again be tied to the Grizzlies. Read more…

The Sign-and-Trade Approach

May 9th, 2010 No comments
Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookEmail this to someone

You may not realize that the Miami Heat will start the offseason with a team salary in excess of the new salary cap threshold. This is caused by intangible charges, called “cap holds,” created by the Heat’s own free agents.

The Heat can very easily get rid of these cap holds in order to create the huge cap space we’ve all been reading about, but does it want to?

While teams with cap space can only spend up to the amount of the salary cap, teams that are over the cap are virtually unlimited in what they can spend through trade.

But the Heat only has two players, Michael Beasley and Daequan Cook, under contract. It doesn’t really have anybody to trade.

Enter the concept of the sign-and-trade.

You may have heard local beat writers discussing the possibility of sign-and-trade agreements as a means for the Heat to increase the total amount of dollars it can spend. They’re right. And they’re wrong. Let me explain. Read more…

Categories: Learning Tags: