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Posts Tagged ‘Shabazz Napier’

Miami Heat Trades Zoran Dragic to Boston Celtics

July 27th, 2015 No comments
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The Miami Heat has traded shooting guard Zoran Dragic to the Boston Celtics, along with $1.6 million in cash to cover his salary with a $100K profit(1) and the Heat’s second-round draft pick in 2020. In return, the Heat will receive a top-55 protected second-round pick from the Celtics in the 2019 NBA draft.

The agreement comes a day after the Heat reached an agreement to trade point guard Shabazz Napier to the Orlando Magic. The Heat traded Napier to the Magic along with $1.1 million in cash in exchange for a top-55 protected second-round pick in 2016.

The second-round picks being returned to the Heat essentially have no value. The Magic and Celtics would need to have one of the five best records in the entire NBA in 2015-16 and 2018-19, respectively, for the Heat to get them. Otherwise, the obligations are extinguished.

The Heat also receives trade exceptions equal to the salary of each player: $1.7 million for Dragic(2), and $1.3 million for Napier. Miami has up to one year to utilize each exception, which can be used to acquire player(s) making up to value of the exception plus $100K in trade or on waivers without sending back salaries in return. The exceptions cannot be combined.  Read more…

Miami Heat Trade Shabazz Napier to Orlando Magic

July 26th, 2015 8 comments
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The Miami Heat has agreed to trade point guard Shabazz Napier and $1.08 million in cash to cover his base salary(1) to the Orlando Magic in exchange for a top-55 protected second-round pick in the 2016 NBA draft. The deal will be formally announced on Monday.

The second-round pick being returned to the Heat in exchange for Napier essentially has no value. The Magic would need to have one of the five best records in the entire NBA in 2015-16 for the Heat to get it. Otherwise, the obligation is extinguished.

The Heat will also receive a $1.29 million trade exception as part of the trade, equal to the amount of Napier’s total salary. The Heat will have up to one year to utilize the exception, which would allow the team to acquire one or more players with total salaries of $1.39 million in trade (or on the waiver wire) without sending back any salaries in return.

That, by all accounts, is a terrible return on investment for the No. 24 pick from the 2014 NBA draft. It means the Heat essentially traded its 2014 first round pick (No. 26), its 2014 second-round pick (No. 55), its 2019 second-round pick and $1 million in cash in exchange for one season of Napier.

Worse still: Napier showed flashes of promise during his rookie season; he was a low-cost player set to make just $1.3 million this season; and the Heat had him under team control for at least the next three years, after which he was to become a restricted free agent.

Why, then, have the Heat agreed to pull the trigger on the trade?  Read more…

Analyzing the Miami Heat’s Approach with Josh Richardson

July 17th, 2015 No comments
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Update (July 28, 2015): Josh Richardson reportedly agreed to a three-year, $2.4 million minimum salary contract with the Miami Heat on Tuesday. Richardson will make a fully guaranteed $525,093 this season. The second year, worth $874,636, will reportedly be partially guaranteed. The third year, worth $1,014,746, will reportedly be subject to a team option. 

The team option would provide the Heat the additional flexibility described below but, given the partial guarantee on the second year, the overall structure of the contract as presently constructed might not be optimal. If the second year is partially guaranteed and the third is subject to a team option, the third year must have the same guarantee percentage and schedule as the second year. By removing the team option, the guarantee percentage and schedule for each of the last two years can differ. Therefore, look for Richardson and the Heat to consider this and possibly change the structure before executing the contract. 

The Miami Heat has very much liked what it has seen thus far from Josh Richardson during summer league.

The Heat selected Richardson with the 40th overall pick in 2015 NBA draft, but the versatility and defensive prowess he displayed during summer league in many ways reflects the first-round grade placed upon him by general manager Pat Riley. Richardson was 24th overall on the team’s draft board.

So why has Riley yet to approach Richardson about a contract?

Well… The roster is still in flux. And as long as that holds true, there is no pressing need for Riley to do so… yet.

When a player is selected in the second round of the draft, he remains the exclusive property of the team that selected him until at least the September 5th immediately following the draft.

At that point, the team needs to make a decision.

In order for the team to retain draft rights to the player, it must submit to him a “Required Tender” by September 5th. The tender is an offer of a contract that affords the player until at least the immediately following October 15 to accept, has a term of one season, calls for at least the minimum salary applicable to the player, and can be fully non-guaranteed.

If the team does not issue a tender by September 5, the drafting team loses its exclusive rights to the player, and the player becomes an unrestricted free agent the following day.

The Heat really likes Richardson, and will not let that happen.

Once (or before) the tender is issued, the player has three primary options: (i) forgo the tender and instead negotiate with the team for a different contract, (ii) forgo the tender and instead seek employment outside the NBA, or (iii) accept the tender and play under its terms for the season to come.  Read more…

Miami Heat Trade Up to Acquire Shabazz Napier in 2014 NBA Draft

June 26th, 2014 No comments
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The Miami Heat had perhaps never been as obvious about their intentions as they were in preparation for the 2014 NBA Draft. They wanted former UConn point guard Shabazz Napier.

They got their man, by making a trade for his draft rights with the Charlotte Hornets.

In return, the Heat dealt draft rights to its two picks P.J. Hairston (26th) and Semaj Christon (55th), a 2019 second-round draft choice, and $1 million in cash.

Napier was projected by many to be a mid-first round pick, with teams such as the Orlando Magic, Atlanta Hawks and Chicago Bulls showing strong interest. The Heat had made an all-out effort in recent days to move up in the draft to improve their odds of selecting him but lacked the resources to get up too high.

Yet as the draft continued, Napier’s name kept getting bypassed.

When he was ultimately selected at No. 24 by the Hornets, there was a brief moment of exasperation. The NBA’s draft order is determined as the inverse of each team’s record at the end of the preceding regular season. The Heat had tied the Portland Trail Blazers and Houston Rockets, finishing the 2013-14 regular season with identical 58-24 records. The NBA therefore held a pair of tiebreakers among the three teams on April 18 to determine the allocation of pick Nos. 24, 25 and 26. Portland, which had previously surrendered its pick to the Hornets in a February 2011 trade for Gerald Wallace, ultimately won a tiebreaker with Miami and Houston, and Houston then won a tiebreaker with Miami. The Heat, therefore, appeared to have lost out on Napier because of draft order tiebreaker unluckiness.

Moments later though, it became apparent that the Hornets had made their selection of Napier on behalf of the Heat. The Heat were apparently unwilling to wait and hope that Napier would fall to them two spots down. Between the Hornets at No. 24 and the Heat at No. 26 stood the Rockets, who are vying for the services of free-agent-to-be LeBron James. The Heat were fearful that the Rockets could poach Napier, a James favorite, as a means to improve their roster, to make the Heat a less desirable destination for James, or both.  Read more…

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