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Posts Tagged ‘Roger Mason Jr.’

Miami Heat Dump Roger Mason Jr. in Trade Deadline Deal

February 20th, 2014 No comments

The Miami Heat have dumped the contract of Roger Mason Jr. at the Feb. 20 trade deadline, in a move that saves owner Micky Arison $1.05 million and opens up a roster spot to utilize either on a current free agent or on a player to be waived over the next 10 days.

The Heat will send Mason Jr. to the Sacramento Kings, who are expected to immediately waive him. They’ll also send $786,095 in cash to complete the deal.

While that amount of cash may seem random, it actually isn’t.

Mason Jr. is a 10-year N.B.A. veteran. He is playing under a one-year contract. He is earning $1,399,507, the minimum salary for a player with his tenure. However, he is only required to be paid $884,293 of that amount, equal to the minimum salary for a two-year N.B.A. veteran. The league will reimburse the rest at the end of the season. Therefore, he really only costs the smaller amount, and only the smaller amount is included in team salary for cap and tax purposes. They do this so teams won’t shy away from signing older veterans simply because they are more expensive than younger veterans.

As for the mechanics of how the reimbursement works, he is to be paid his full prorated salary of $8,232.39 per day (equal to his $1,399,507 salary divided by the 170 days in the regular season), until the total reaches $884,293. At that point, he continues to get paid his fully prorated salary but the league reimburses the rest. With the regular season having started on Oct. 29, he earned that much by Feb. 13, 2014. Since that time, his services have essentially been free of charge for the Heat.

However, since the contract has now been traded, the reimbursement will get allocated to the respective teams based on the number of days accrued with each team. Therefore, while the Kings will be responsible for the $452,782 remaining on his contract for the 55 days left in the regular season, they will actually only owe $286,095 after accounting for the reimbursement.

The Heat essentially covered his remaining salary obligations for the Kings, and then topped it off with a $500,000 profit, which serves as the only impetus for Sacramento to make the deal.

In order to send something back, which is required in all trades, the Kings will return the Heat a 2015 second-round pick which is protected for selections 31-49 and 56-60. If the pick ultimately falls within either of its protected ranges and is therefore not conveyed, then Sacramento’s obligation to Miami will be extinguished. This essentially means that the Heat will only get the pick if it lands between pick numbers 50 and 55.

While this range may seem random, it actually isn’t.

The Kings intended to provide enough protection on the pick to ensure that it will never be received. Such trades are commonplace in the N.B.A., and are typically accomplished by trading away a second-round pick on condition that it lands within the last five of the draft. However, the Kings have previously traded the pick to the Boston Celtics with that condition. So, now, the Celtics will receive the pick if it is among the last five, the Heat will receive the pick if it is among the previous five, and the Kings will retain the pick if it is among the first twenty of the second round, as is likely.  Read more…

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Miami Heat at the NBA Trade Deadline

January 21st, 2014 No comments

The Feb. 20 N.B.A. trade deadline is now officially less than a month away.

The Miami Heat started their dealings early this season, shipping Joel Anthony to the Boston Celtics along with a million dollars and two draft picks (one second-rounder and another that was originally Philadelphia’s and will likely become a pair of second-rounders). In return, the Heat got a player from Golden State, but this deal wasn’t about Toney Douglas as much as it was about the benjamins.

Anthony, who lost his role to Chris Andersen last season and had been a reclusive presence on the court ever since, ultimately became a casualty of the Heat’s cash crunch and managing partner Micky Arison’s desire to creep closer to the luxury-tax line. He didn’t get there, not with this deal, but it did save him around $20 million, and it did eliminate one of the obstacles to reshaping the roster after this season, when LeBron James, Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh can all opt out of their existing contracts.

Now, it’s conceivable that only Norris Cole ($2.0 million) and Udonis Haslem ($4.6 million option) will be under contract on July 1, as Arison, Pat Riley and the Heat try to retain James, Wade and Bosh, and perhaps Mario Chalmers, Ray Allen, Michael Beasley and even Greg Oden.

That’s the long-term vision.

The short-term? The trade did nothing to advance the cause. The Heat, championship material as they are currently constructed, nonetheless have various needs that have yet to be addressed.  Read more…

Million-Dollar Roger Mason Jr. Decision Due by Jan. 7

December 27th, 2013 No comments

The date in which all N.B.A. contracts become fully guaranteed for the rest of the season, Jan. 10, is looming. That leaves the Heat with a decision to make on the non-guaranteed contract of Roger Mason Jr.

Mason Jr. plays a somewhat valuable role for the Heat as a versatile three-point shooting specialist who serves as the team’s third string option at both the point and shooting guard positions. But he (along with Michael Beasley, who has undoubtedly earned his keep), is also the only player who has a less than fully guaranteed contract.

Mason Jr. is a 10-year N.B.A. veteran. He is playing under a one-year contract. He is earning $1,399,507, the minimum salary for a player with his tenure.

When a player has been in the N.B.A. for three or more seasons and is playing under a one-year contract at the minimum salary, the league reimburses the team for part of his salary – any amount above the minimum salary level for a two-year veteran. As a result, the Heat is only responsible for $884,293 of his salary, equal to the minimum salary for a two-year veteran. The league will reimburse the Heat for the rest at the end of the season. Therefore, if Mason Jr. plays out his contract, he really only costs the Heat the smaller amount, and only the smaller amount is included in team salary for cap and tax purposes. They do this so teams won’t shy away from signing older veterans simply because they are more expensive than younger veterans.

As for the mechanics of how the reimbursement works, the Heat is responsible for Mason Jr.’s full prorated salary of $8,232.39 per day (equal to his $1,399,507 salary divided by the 170 days in the regular season), until the total reaches $884,293. At that point, the league reimburses the Heat for the rest. With the regular season having started on Oct. 29, he will earn that much by Feb. 13, 2014. His services from that point on essentially become free of charge.

However, if the Heat want to capitalize on his non-guarantee, they will have to waive him by no later than 5 p.m. on Jan. 7. That’s because all non-guaranteed contracts across the N.B.A. will become fully guaranteed on Jan. 10, so a player needs be gone by no later than Jan. 9 to avoid the guarantee and it takes 48 hours for a waived player to actually clear waivers. Players continue to get paid while they are on waivers.

By that time, Mason Jr. will have already earned $600,965 on his contract. Therefore, if the Heat were to waive him on Jan. 7, they’d be saving a total of $283,328. When including the tax, given the Heat’s current tax position, that amount rises to $991,649.

The Heat is already spending $110,077,842 on player payroll obligations this season, an amount at which the team presumably isn’t anywhere near profitable, so, to some extent, every dollar counts – particularly a million of them.

However, there is some degree of financial justification not to waive him in order to capitalize on his partial guarantee.  Read more…