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Posts Tagged ‘Joe Johnson’

Miami Heat Player-by-Player Overview

May 27th, 2016 1 comment
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I have a request. I try to write posts which I believe are unique, in depth and insightful. I hope you agree. I therefore ask that you please not simply copy my work without providing proper credit. It feels rather awful to see my work being exploited. If just you ask, I am more than willing to help out anyone and everyone in any way I can (and do so on a regular basis behind the scenes).

The Miami Heat will start the summer with just six players under contract for the 2016-17 season – Chris Bosh, Goran Dragic, Josh McRoberts, Justise Winslow, Briante Weber and Josh Richardson. Those six players will cost a combined $49.8 million.

The remaining nine players will become free agents – Dwyane Wade, Luol Deng, Udonis Haslem, Hassan Whiteside, Gerald Green, Amare Stoudemire, Tyler Johnson, Joe Johnson and Dorell Wright. Those nine players will carry a combined $54.7 million in cap holds.

The Heat will therefore technically start the summer over the cap, with a team salary of $104.5 million against a projected salary cap of $92.0 million.

Here is a brief overview of how things can go from there for all 15 current Heat players.  Read more…

A Preliminary Look at the Miami Heat 2016 Offseason

May 16th, 2016 1 comment
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I have a request. I try to write posts which I believe are unique, in depth and insightful. I hope you agree. I therefore ask that you please not simply copy my work without providing proper credit. It feels rather awful to see my work being exploited. If just you ask, I am more than willing to help out anyone and everyone in any way I can (and do so on a regular basis behind the scenes).

This is the first in a series of eight posts that I believe will cover all aspects of the Miami Heat summer. This one is meant as the general overview. Each subsequent post will cover specific concepts related to this overview in greater detail, as well as provide specific possible scenarios. Though all eight posts are already written, I will publish one per day. 

The NBA salary cap is set to explode higher this summer, from $70 million this past season to an estimated $92 million.

The massive increase will give the Miami Heat a ton of cap room with which to maneuver. Choosing how to allocate it, however, will force the Heat to make some tough decisions.

Miami will start the summer with just six players under contract for the 2016-17 season – Chris Bosh, Goran Dragic, Josh McRoberts, Justise Winslow, Briante Weber ($219K guaranteed) and Josh Richardson (non-guaranteed). Those six players will cost a combined $49.8 million.

Miami will also retain the rights to potential restricted free agent Tyler Johnson.

Due to the nature of Johnson’s contract situation(1), at a cost of just a $1.2 million qualifying offer, Miami will be able to sit back this summer and wait for another team to sign him to an offer sheet which, by rule, can have a starting salary no higher than $5.6 million. Then, assuming it times everything correctly, after all of its cap space is used up elsewhere, the Heat can exceed the cap to match that offer sheet and retain him. If no other team engages with Johnson, the Heat can exceed the cap in signing him to a new contract with a starting salary as high as $6.2 million.

Taking into account the $49.8 million in 2016-17 salaries already on the books, the $1.2 million qualifying offer for Tyler Johnson, and applicable charges for open roster spots, Miami would be left with approximately $40 million in cap space with which to spend on its internal free agents – including Hassan Whiteside, Dwyane Wade, Luol Deng and Joe Johnson, among others – as well as any external free agents it may seek to target.

The Heat could increase its cap space even further if it were to waive and stretch the contract of McRoberts, which has two years and $11.8 million remaining on it. By doing so, the Heat would replace his $5.8 million and $6.0 million salaries for the 2016-17 and 2017-18 seasons, respectively, with a $2.4 million dead-money cap charge that would be placed onto the Heat’s books for each of the next five seasons (through 2020-21). That, in turn, would increase the Heat’s cap space to as much as $43 million.

If Miami could instead somehow find a taker for McRoberts without taking any salary back in return, cap space could grow to $45 million. Beyond player assets and a first-round pick all the way out in the year 2023, however, the Heat doesn’t have much with which to entice a potential trade partner to do so.

Choosing how to allocate that $40 million to $45 million of cap space will be of critical concern.  Read more…

Miami Heat Sign Joe Johnson to Rest-of-Season Minimum Salary Deal

February 28th, 2016 No comments
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Pat Riley wanted to add what could very well be a core piece to the Miami Heat roster, and he apparently wasn’t willing to wait to do it.

Just days after extolling the virtues of cleansing his team of its repeater tax issues, Riley officially signed coveted guard-forward Joe Johnson to a rest-of-season minimum-salary contract just an hour or so after he cleared waivers on Saturday night.

The move vaults the Heat right back over the luxury tax threshold.

If Riley had instead signed Johnson a mere eight days later, on March 6th (or thereafter), Miami would have instead remained below the tax threshold.

Johnson will earn $414,481, of which the Heat will owe just $261,894. The rest will also be paid out by the Heat but be reimbursed to the team by the league office at the end of the season.

The true cost of the Johnson signing for the Heat could be significantly higher, however, if Riley doesn’t take action to drop the team below the tax threshold by April 13th. That’s the final day of the regular season, the day in which the Heat’s team salary will be locked in for the purposes of the tax calculation.

Crossing the tax line would impact both this and future seasons.

The Johnson signing puts the Heat $43,894 over the line, which would trigger a tax payment of $109,736. Crossing the line would also disqualify the Heat from receiving a tax distribution – a pro rata payout given to non-taxpaying teams totaling 50 percent of the payments made by tax teams – currently projected at $2.6 million.

The cost of Johnson’s contract would therefore effectively become: $262K in salary + $110K in luxury taxes + $2.6 million in tax distributions forgone = $2.9 million.  Read more…

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Miami Heat on the Verge of Signing Joe Johnson

February 26th, 2016 2 comments
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With the NBA trade deadline now behind us, buyout season is in full swing.

Players such as Anderson Varejao, David Lee, J.J. Hickson and Steve Novak have already secured their releases from their prior teams and signed with new ones. Others, such as Joe Johnson and Andre Miller, have reached buyout agreements and are in the process of being waived, and will become free agents shortly. Still others, such as Kevin Martin and Ty Lawson, are rumored to be negotiating buyout agreements with their existing teams and, if successful, would become free agents thereafter.

Buyout season is a frenetic time because it represents the last real opportunity for significant player moment. It can be loosely defined as the period of time that starts after the trade deadline expires, and ends on March 1st. Players must be waived by their existing teams by March 1st (whether in conjunction with a buyout or not) to be eligible for the playoffs with another team.

A buyout is essentially an agreement between a player and his team wherein the team agrees to terminate the player’s contract in exchange for a reduction in the remaining guaranteed salary he is owed.

Technically, a buyout constitutes an amendment to an existing player contract in which: (i) the team will request waivers on the player, and (ii) if the player clears waivers, the remaining portion of his guaranteed salary will be reduced or eliminated.

“Waivers” are a temporary status for players who are released by their teams. A team initiates the waiver process by “requesting waivers” on the player it is releasing. The player stays “on waivers” for 48 hours, during which time other teams may claim the player.

If a team makes a successful waiver claim, it acquires the player and his existing contract, and pays the remainder of his salary. Any negotiated buyout is nullified, and the waiving team is relieved of all responsibility for the player.

Waiver claims are rare, particularly for players with large contracts, for two primary reasons.

First, they require: (i) a claiming team to either have room below the salary cap to fit the player’s entire salary, a trade exception for at least the player’s salary, a disabled player exception for at least the player’s salary and that the player be in the final season of his contract, or (ii) that the contract be initially executed for two seasons or fewer at the minimum salary.

Second, they require a claiming team to pay out the remaining salary obligations under the contract in full.

If no team has claimed the player before the end of the waiver period, he “clears waivers.” The player’s buyout (if any) takes effect, his contract is terminated, and he becomes a free agent.

The Miami Heat has taken dead-aim at Joe Johnson.

Johnson is assured to clear waivers because no NBA team has enough room, or a large enough exception, to claim his $24.9 million salary.

According to Zach Lowe, Johnson, who reportedly agreed to give up a whopping $3.0 million of the $6.7 million remaining to be paid on his expiring contract in order to secure his release from the Brooklyn Nets, is expected to sign with the Heat, and will do so after he clears waivers on Saturday.

But Miami has a problem.  Read more…

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Joe Johnson Gets His Max Deal

July 1st, 2010 No comments
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The Atlanta Hawks have offered up a ridiculous 6-year, $119 million contract offer to Joe Johnson. This is good news for a Heat team that figures to be battling it out with the Bulls for Eastern Conference supremacy for years to come. Johnson figured to be a nice Plan B alternative in Chicago, once which most figured would solve the team’s problem of not having the required cap space to offer up two maximum contracts. It was hoped by some that Johnson would be accommodating to a contract starting in the $13 million range – the theory being that without the necessary cap space to secure James and Bosh, a pairing of Johnson and Bosh would round out Chicago’s rotation quite nicely. Now, however, that appears impossible.

Of course, nothing can be made official until the end of July Moratorium on the 8th. But if the Hawks play hard ball and refuse a sign-and-trade, as they seem destined to do, it would be awfully difficult for Johnson to turn down that offer.

While the Hawks have secured their own star two-guard for years to come, they don’t gain anything with the move. The team now figures to have access to just a mid-level (~$5.7 million) and a bi-annual ($2.08 million) exception with which to improve its roster from last season.

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Be Careful What You Wish For With Joe Johnson

May 26th, 2010 No comments
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Joe Johnson is a great player. He has great length, great handles, a nice shooting touch, and he sees the floor. He’s also about as unselfish a player as you can get from an All-Star. He’d be a nice addition to any team, particularly the Heat.

But there are plenty of issues to worry about.

For starters, let’s rid ourselves of the notion that Johnson is worth a max contract. That’s flat ridiculous.

When the Hawks reportedly offered Johnson a four-year $60 million contract extension last summer, even that was arguably a big stretch. It ignored his age, his style of play, and his lack of production in key situations. But at least you could see the logic. The Hawks were a team on the rise, and Johnson was playing a key role. The Hawks were paying him as much for his past as his future. They were paying for a beloved Atlanta fixture to stay.

After having rejected that proposal, he figures to seek even more on the open market. A maximum five year contract would run his new team about $18.3 million per season.

So where does Johnson actually rank in the NBA? Let’s ignore need for a second, and focus solely on ability.

Amare, Bosh, Carmelo, Deron, Duncan, Durant, Gasol, Howard, Kobe, LeBron, Nash, Nowitzki, Paul, Roy and Wade and are inarguably better than Joe Johnson. You can’t even make a case that Johnson is better than any of one of these fifteen guys, right? Read more…

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