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Posts Tagged ‘Anthony Morrow’

Miami Heat Struggling Early In Free Agency

July 3rd, 2014 10 comments
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The Miami Heat would love to get younger.

The Heat would love to get some youthful assistance on the wing, as protection for Dwyane Wade as his advancing age and health restrictions cause him to miss so many games and render him so ineffective in so many others.

The Heat would love to get a youthful presence down low, a big man capable of imposing his will on the block and the boards.

But for as much as we, as fans, have dreamed it to be so, it was never truly possible. Supremely talented youth is almost never a possibility on the open market. The very nature of NBA rules makes it virtually impossible to attract youthful talent in free agency.

The intensity of recruiting these days is such that the vast majority of all of the best free agents will have once been first round draft picks. Such selections provide their teams the promise of cheap labor over an extended period – via four year “rookie scale” contracts which make it categorically impossible for them to shake free during the interim. If not for being operated under a set of rules which were collectively bargained, the concept alone would surely violate anti-trust laws.

And, yet, it doesn’t get much better for these players after just the four years. At that point, the door opens, but only very slightly. The player is then to enter free agency in restricted fashion, such that any agreement he strikes with any team can be matched by his prior team and, in-so-doing, obligate said player to play for his prior team under its terms. These rules are so restrictive that, typically, the only option for any team desiring such a player is to severely overpay for him, in the hopes that his prior team refuses to match such ludicrous payouts. Most teams don’t even bother to bid on such players. And, thus, by the time the better former first round draft picks are truly free to consider other alternatives, somewhere between eight and nine years will have already passed them by.  Read more…

Would the Big Three Take Less to Help the Miami Heat?

June 21st, 2014 5 comments
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Update (6/28): I wrote the following article several weeks ago, and posted it exactly one week ago. Since that time, several things have changed (e.g., the Heat traded up in the draft to select Shabazz Napier, several Heat players opted out of their contracts, the Heat have been rumored to be seeking a trade partner for Norris Cole, etc.), which slightly alter the figures presented in this post. This table provides an updated depiction of the hypothetical situation described below.

The day LeBron James, Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh agreed to join together with the Miami Heat in the summer of 2010, they laid out a plan. They would each play four years together, then re-evaluate. They each signed nine-figure, six-year deals containing opt out rights prior to the final two. They were expecting titles. We all were.

Through the first three of those years, all was as projected to be. Three straight NBA Finals appearances, two straight titles. But that was before this past year turned into a disaster, before they got throttled by the San Antonio Spurs.

James, Wade and Bosh are all on vacation now, a sort of rejuvenation for a trio who have played more basketball over a four year stretch than any other in league history. They will each take some time to consider their futures, to consider whether or not they wish to terminate their contracts.

The wait is unnerving. It is a reminder that the Heat and James, in particular, have a very uncertain future together, that his potential free agency, which could arrive in just days, looms over this city with as much significance as did Wade’s four years ago. It’s caused us to lose our equilibrium. It’s caused us to lose our perspective. We need to “get a grip” on reality. The Miami Heat, as presently constructed, can still be a championship-caliber team.

Sure, the team has it flaws. Lots of them. And they need to be addressed. But we, as fans, are hoping for much more than that. Cutting corners in the repair of a leaky dam will eventually cause it to burst. Like it did in 2006-07. Which caused 2007-08. Nothing short of a complete overhaul, then, will appease us.

A tear down and restructure requires sacrifice. It requires James, Wade and Bosh to each opt out of his contract and take less. Much less. It’s the only way. But is it possible?  Read more…

Miami Heat 2013 Offseason Primer

July 1st, 2013 No comments
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Over the past three offseasons, the Miami Heat has constructed, augmented and refined.

Three summers ago, it was uniting LeBron James, Chris Bosh and Mike Miller with Dwyane Wade and Udonis Haslem as a team that would reach the NBA Finals.

The following offseason, one delayed by a lockout, glue guy Shane Battier supplemented the mix to help the Heat win the 2012 NBA championship.

And last summer, Ray Allen and Rashard Lewis were added to help turn the 2012 title into a 2013 repeat.

Because of the team’s ongoing success, as well as the 2013-14 contract options of Allen, Lewis, James Jones and Mario Chalmers all leading them back for another season, there doesn’t figure to be much heavy lifting this time around.

The NBA’s free agency period officially began Monday morning at 12:01 EDT.

While teams can start negotiating immediately, most free agent signings, and all trades, cannot be officially executed until July 10, allowing the league time to compute revenues for the now-expired 2012-13 season and finalize the salary cap and luxury-tax calculations for 2013-14.

However, signings that do not rely in any way upon the specific value of the salary cap can be executed with the start of the new salary cap year on July 1. Such signings include minimum salary deals for up to two years in length.

For the Heat, still basking in a second consecutive championship, the concerns are limited, with 12 players already under guaranteed contract for next season: James, Wade, Bosh, Chalmers, Haslem, Battier, Allen, Lewis, Jones, Miller, Joel Anthony and Norris Cole. In addition, neophyte power forward Jarvis Varnado has a non-guaranteed contract in place that becomes $250,000 guaranteed if he is on the opening-night roster.

That’s 13 regular-season rosters spots potentially filled. Teams can have as many as 20 players under contract in the offseason, in addition to players involved in summer-camp and summer-league tryouts, but need to reduce to between 13 and 15 by the start of the regular season.

While virtually the entire championship core from last season has already committed to return, there is still work to be done:  Read more…