Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Amnesty’

Miami Heat Use Amnesty Provision on Mike Miller

July 16th, 2013 1 comment

It was inevitable. But it is still painful.

He made a ridiculous seven 3-pointers against the Oklahoma City Thunder in the clinching game that gave the Miami Heat the 2012 NBA championship. He made one of the most iconic 3-pointers, shoeless, in an elimination game and an incredible 11-18 overall against the San Antonio Spurs that ultimately gave the Heat their second consecutive title a year later.

Now the Heat’s affable 3-point marksman is gone, essentially gone for good, after three seasons of playing alongside LeBron James, Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh in Miami.

The Heat invoked their one-time right to waive a player through the NBA’s amnesty provision, electing to utilize it on 33-year-old Mike Miller in advance of Tuesday’s 11:59 p.m. deadline.

It had to be done. Despite his clutch and mechanically perfect shooting stroke, Miller was the fourth highest paid player on the Heat’s roster behind James, Bosh and Wade. But there were many months during Miller’s three years in Miami when he wasn’t even the eighth man in the rotation.

The Thunder trade of James Harden, the New York Knicks refusal to match the offer sheet of Jeremy Lin, the Memphis Grizzlies trade of Rudy Gay, and now the Heat amnesty of Miller were all done for the same reason: the new CBA in operation.  Read more…

Categories: Commentary Tags: ,

For the Heat, Amnesty is a Big-Money Decision

July 7th, 2013 No comments

This post is an elaboration of a June 23 post regarding the fate of Mike Miller. It details the calculations supporting the conclusions that were drawn — that, despite public comments by Pat Riley to the contrary, Mike Miller will be amnestied — so that readers can appreciate the complexity of the situation and decide for themselves the appropriate course of action. 

Wednesday is a key day in the NBA.

It’s the league’s equivalent of National Signing Day – the day in which new contracts can be signed and trades can be executed. After more than a week of furtive negotiating, non-binding agreement, and heart-palpitating waiting, everything becomes official.

It’s also the start of the amnesty waiver window, a seven-day period that this year runs from July 10 to July 16, when eligible teams may designate eligible players for amnesty release.

Amnesty was added to the Collective Bargaining Agreement that ended the 2011 lockout. Because of the new, far more onerous luxury tax consequences that will be fazed in starting next season, teams have been allowed to designate one player for waiver in a manner such that his remaining salary would not count against the salary cap and luxury tax. While amnesty eases salary-cap and luxury-tax concerns, teams still have to pay out the player’s remaining salary, including any remaining option years.

Teams are only allowed to make such designations each offseason during a one-week window starting the day after the moratorium ends. When that happens, all other teams are immediately notified by the league. They are then allowed place a claim in order to acquire the amnestied player, but only if they have the necessary cap space to do so. Teams can make either a full or partial waiver claim.

When a team makes a full waiver claim it acquires the player, assumes his full contract, and pays all remaining salary obligations; the waiving team has no further salary obligation to the player. A partial waiver claim is a bid for a single dollar amount. If no team makes a full waiver claim, the player is awarded to the team submitting the highest bid in a partial waiver claim; the amount of the partial waiver claim is then subtracted from the waiving team’s continuing obligations to their amnestied player. The minimum possible bid a team can make is the minimum salary applicable to the player for all remaining guaranteed seasons of his contract.

Fifteen of the league’s 30 teams have already utilized their amnesty provision in previous seasons. An additional one has no remaining players who qualify for amnesty.

Which brings us to the Heat, one of the remaining 14 teams yet to act.  Read more…