I HAVE A REQUEST: I strive to make my posts unique, creative, insightful and unlike any others. I would respectfully ask that you please not simply copy my ideas. If you find my work helpful as you create or edit your own work, I would ask that you please provide proper credit.

Wade out on the recruiting trail

June 10th, 2010 2 comments

Read this (as per this article):

“At the same time the Miami Heat staff was busy throwing free agent Udonis Haslem a surprise birthday party to try and convince him to stay in Miami, it appears as if Dwyane Wade was busy doing some recruiting of his own. Wade was spotted dining at BOA Steakhouse on Sunset along with girlfriend Gabrielle Union, Raptors free agent to be Chris Bosh, and a few others as part of a small late-night gathering at the restaurant. Normally, we wouldn’t think anything [of] a few All-Star NBA players getting together for dinner, but this isn’t your typical set of circumstances.”

“Wade has made it a point to say he was committed to speaking with some of his free agent counterparts about their futures. We all assumed it would be a summit of sorts. Wade seems to be taking a more personal approach during the NBA Finals.”

Yes! Did I not mention the preferred approach was the more personal one-on-one touch, when all else were screaming summit? This is why all three of my readers should trust in me. I’m a strategy man. That, or I got very lucky just this once and I want the world to know.

Categories: Commentary Tags:

Yao Ming to opt out of his contract?

June 10th, 2010 4 comments

It has always been assumed that Yao Ming wouldn’t dare opt out of his current contract with the Rockets, which has one year remaining at $17.7 million, after taking the year off to rehab his seemingly always injured left foot. But when asked about the possibility in March, his answer was surprisingly non-committal.

“Not sure. I’m not sure until after we discuss it,” Yao said. “We have not started to discuss it yet, so I’m not sure, either way. I have to talk to my agent first before we start to decide where I need to go. If you ask my agent, he will say, ‘I have to ask Yao and we will start discussing it’.”

Well, the two sides are now apparently discussing it. But the situation is no less muddy.

Apparently, Yao and the Rockets are working on a contract extension. Rumor has it that he would opt out of his current deal and then would be offered a new 4 year maximum contract. The snag? Well, Yao wants 6 years.

He’s got to be crazy, right?

Every so often, an incredible physical specimen enters into a sport that he is not conventionally built for, but uses that very same advantage to become a dominant force.

When Yao Ming first entered the NBA, he was certainly an incredible physical specimen at 7’6″ tall, and he could do things that guys who were only seven feet tall couldn’t dream of doing. One of the best shooting big men ever to play the game, Yao had an amazing touch. When he got the ball down low, he was the closest thing this league had to unstoppable. Even the league’s biggest centers had no chance of blocking his turnaround shots. The only real answer to his size and shooting ability was to stop him from catching the ball on the block in the first place.

He could do the conventional things big men do too, such as block shots and rebound. He was an amazing talent, nothing like the NBA had ever seen before.

He may not have had the strength of a Shaquille O’Neal or the agility of a (I’m not sure who to put here, but he’s certainly not what you’d consider agile), but his size, skill, and competitiveness were more than enough to dominate on a nightly basis. When the national audience got a peek at him for the first time, we were convinced he would be a star. Remember that January 2003 game against Shaq, when he scored six points and blocked two O’Neal shots in the game’s opening minutes?

In that regard, he hasn’t disappointed. Over the course of his seven-year career, he has proven to be the clear-cut best center in the professional game. Dwight Howard’s performance in the Eastern Conference Finals should end any lingering debate.

But what we couldn’t foresee back then was that the rigors of the NBA would prove too much for his long and slender frame. Read more…

Categories: Commentary Tags:

The True Cost of Extending

June 9th, 2010 4 comments

Christopher Reina, executive editor of RealGM, published this article yesterday – suggesting that free agency will cost each member of Wade/James/Bosh trio millions of dollars.

Huh?

If it didn’t shock the heck out of you, it should have. Because it’s wrong!

The minute Wade becomes a free agent, deciding against exercising his player option with the Heat in order to sign an extension, he will be leaving money on the table. This is true. But only in the first year, and only in the amount of $580,335. Every year thereafter, this number begins to shrink. Until year four, when it vanishes completely.

There is no mysterious $1.9 million cost. It doesn’t exist. Forget you ever read it.

I’m guessing most of you don’t care why. But if you’re curious, click away… Read more…

Categories: Learning Tags:

Buyer Beware

June 8th, 2010 4 comments

The quality of the 2010 free agent class is well known, and has dominated discussion in South Florida for nearly three years. The “Summer of LeBron,” which kicks off in just over three weeks, is sure to change the landscape of professional basketball.

Free agency, this season more than any other in history, will turn the NBA into a revolving door. Teams that were underachievers will have a legitimate opportunity to transform themselves into instant contenders simply by signing a star player or two. The bidding wars for top performers are sure to be as competitive and entertaining as the games they will ultimately play in their new arenas.

But with more money available this off-season than players on which it can be wisely spent, teams are sure to throw exorbitant amounts of cash at guys that are otherwise undeserving.

General managers need be warned. Choose your investments wisely.

With that in mind, let us be reminded about the ugly side of free agency. In the second of my depressing and controversial two-part expose on the worsts in Heat history, let’s look at the worst free agent signing. Read more…

Categories: Commentary Tags: ,

Patrick Beverley’s Journey to the Miami Heat

June 7th, 2010 1 comment

Patrick Beverley has had one lifelong goal – to play in the NBA.

After a trying, vindicating, tumultuous, and encouraging 21 years of life, his dream might just be drawing near.

The Early Years

Patrick was born to Lisa Beverley, a 17-year-old single mother, on the west side of Chicago.

As a child, he never met his biological father, Patrick Bracy, a local hoops star in his own youth. His only enduring connection to his father was his old high school basketball trophies that were always lying around. He revered them, claiming early on that he wanted twice the number of trophies his dad got.

The inner city of Chicago is a gritty place, with some of the highest levels of poverty in the United States. The area has been neglected for decades. Public schools are crumbling, store fronts are vacant, apartment buildings are dilapidated, graffiti covers the walls, windows are boarded up with bars on them, trash litters the sidewalks, and weeds sprout through the concrete. Basketball is often seen as the only way out, not just for young kids with talent but also for their parents and siblings. Developing talent is encouraged from a young age. It’s often seen as the only thing that matters.

The playgrounds of Chicago have long been a hoops hotbed. Derrick Rose is the latest in a long line of Chicago-raised NBA royalty. Before Rose, there was Dwyane Wade. Before Wade, there was Antoine Walker. Before Walker, there was Isaiah Thomas. Before Isaiah, there was Maurice Cheeks.  Read more…

Categories: Commentary Tags:

Memory Lane Revisited

June 6th, 2010 4 comments

It was July 2007.

Just fifteen months prior, the Heat had secured its first championship in franchise history, backed by the scintillating playoff performance of superstar Dwyane Wade. The Heat was flying high. Alonzo Mourning and Gary Payton both quickly agreed to re-sign, wanting to win another title. During the championship parade in Miami, Shaquille O’Neal guaranteed it.

Then came the awful 2006/07 campaign. Shaq lost his last little bit of youth. Gary Payton was benched for poor performance. James Posey and Antoine Walker were deactivated after failing body mass exams. And the Heat was relegated to mediocrity. Miami became the first defending champion since 1957 to get swept in the first round in the following season, losing at the hands of the Chicago Bulls.

The Heat was looking to rebuild.

The priority was point guard, largely because the Heat had concerns about the health of incumbent starter Jason Williams – who had battled several injuries during his two seasons in Miami.

The primary target: Mo Williams.

Williams was the second-most-coveted point guard on the market, after the Pistons’ Chauncey Billups. In Williams, Riley saw a young point guard who did not need the ball in his hands, one willing to spot up for jumpers and help space the floor for a Wade/O’Neal tandem. The addition was speculated to vault the Heat back into title contention.

The desire was mutual. In his player biography, Williams listed Miami as his favorite NBA city.

The problem, of course, was money. Read more…

Categories: Commentary Tags:

Calculating the Salary Cap

June 5th, 2010 No comments

We’ve all been operating under the assumption of a $56.1 million projected salary cap, which was provided by Commissioner Stern prior to the playoffs. How did he come by that figure?

During July Moratorium, the league will project both basketball-related revenues (“Projected BRI”) and player benefits for the upcoming season. They will then look at the previous season’s Projected BRI to see if it was below the actual results (“BRI”). They will use these two data points to calculate the salary cap.

The league will take 51% of Projected BRI, subtract projected benefits, and make adjustments if the previous season’s BRI was below projections. They will then divide the result by the number of NBA teams to arrive at the cap.

( Projected BRI * 51% – Projected Benefits – (Projected BRI – BRI from last season, only if positive) ) / 30

This season’s BRI is almost certain to fall below original projections. I estimate that last July the league projected BRI growth of 1.6%. At the same time, they issued a warning that BRI could fall as much as 5%-10%, leading to original salary cap forecasts of $50.4 million to $53.6 million. The revised BRI decline of 0.5% then led to a bump in forecasts to $56.1 million.

Why would the league forecast BRI growth of 1.6% and issue a warning it could fall by as much as 10% at the same time?

The answer lies in how Projected BRI is determined. Read more…

Categories: Learning Tags:

For Pat Riley, the time is now

June 2nd, 2010 7 comments

This is it. This is the moment we’ve been waiting for.

Every decision that has culminated in the current Miami Heat roster was made by a Pat Riley who already had his current strategy in mind. He has no excuses.

It took a lot of patience for Heat fans to get to this point. We sat idly by as the best player in team history utterly wasted three years of his prime. We suffered through a 15-win season. We watched the rest of the conference improve around us.

We did it all because Pat asked us to trust in him. He convinced us it was all a means to an end. He had grander visions in mind – visions of rebuilding in the summer of 2010.

We didn’t always agree with the decisions he was making. There were several that infuriated us along the way.

When James Jones was signed in July 2008, the partial guarantee was dubbed as one which ensures that Miami could still have maximum spending capability. After a starting role in the 2009 NBA playoffs, he was banished to the bench for all but 503 minutes of mop-up duty in 2010.

Daequan Cook’s fall from grace had already removed much of the luster from the 3-point championship he won at last year’s All-Star Game when Riley made a decision in October to pick up Cook’s option for the coming season. Pat had already been informed by the league of a projected 2010 salary cap as low as $50.4 million, yet he was willing to invest more than $2.1 million in a player with an uneven track record who, at best, would never be more than a quality backup to one of the best players in the game today.

Despite our hesitations, we believed in him. Because he had the resume to suggest he knew better. And isn’t it always easier just to assume that the people with the power have access to information we don’t?

Along the way, we overlooked some miraculous draft blunders. We overlooked several high-profile failed recruitment attempts, rationalizing that the team simply didn’t have the money to make an adequate pitch.

Now we do.

When Pat developed his vision, he couldn’t possibly have envisioned such a vast wealth of free agent talent. It had simply never happened before. Without question, the NBA’s free agent class of 2010 is the most talented in league history. Read more…

Categories: Commentary Tags:

Exceeding the Salary Cap

June 1st, 2010 2 comments

Given the constraints imposed by the number $56.1 million, we’re all searching for ways in which the collective bargaining agreement would allow the Heat to exceed the salary cap.

There are four primary mechanisms which the Heat will be able to utilize to exceed the cap: Read more…

Categories: Learning Tags:

Filling Out the Roster

May 31st, 2010 5 comments

Many of us have our doubts. We ask ourselves whether it truly can be done. Can the Miami Heat realistically build a championship caliber roster while operating within the confines of the salary cap? It doesn’t seem possible.

We point to the evidence. The four semi-finalists in the 2010 NBA Playoffs have team salaries as follows:

1. Los Angeles Lakers: $91,341,066
2. Boston Celtics: $84,069,655
3. Orlando Magic: $80,449,669
4. Phoenix Suns: $74,738,817

Each is significantly to ridiculously more than the Heat will be able to spend. But for the sake of argument, let’s analyze these numbers for a moment.

Yes, the Lakers, Celtics and Magic made a conscious decision to (over)spend. But they’ve realized some nice returns on their investments. The organizations are wildly profitable, producing an average operating income of more than $20 million during the 2008/09 season. And they’re perennial powerhouses.

I take more of an interest in the Phoenix number. If you recall, the Suns completed a blockbuster trade in July that sent Shaquille O’Neal to the Cavaliers in exchange for Ben Wallace, Sasha Pavolic and $500,000. For the Suns, the trade was a straight salary dump. Wallace was subsequently bought out for $10 million from a contract that would have paid him $14 million. Pavolic, whose $5.0 million contract was only partially guaranteed for $1.25 million, was waived. With the moves, Phoenix saved $18.0 million in salaries and luxury tax payments.

The maneuvering also meant that $11,250,000 was spent on two players that didn’t make the regular season roster. So the true team salary, for comparative purposes, is a relatively paltry $63,488,817.

At just $63 million, the Suns put a big scare into the defending champions. The Heat, although constrained by the $56.1 million salary cap, will likely spend on the order of $60 million after utilizing its available exceptions. So all of a sudden, creating a winner seems possible. Difficult, but possible.

But operating with such limited funds does have its drawbacks. What it means is that Pat Riley will need to allocate the bulk of Micky’s money on the starting five. Therein lies the problem. The potential lack of depth becomes an overriding concern. Read more…

Categories: Commentary Tags: