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Miami’s future draft selections

The Michael Beasley transaction was completed yesterday with a bit of an unexpected turn. Instead of a swap right of future first round positions, Miami will acquire Minnesota’s 2011 and 2014 second-round picks.

The rest of the off-season figures to be low key from a draft pick trading standpoint.

Here’s an overview of the Miami Heat’s future draft pick scenario:

2011: No first round picks; one second round pick (Minnesota)
2012
: One first round pick (swap right to Cleveland); one second round pick (Memphis; top-55 protected)
2013
: No first round pick; one second round pick
2014
: One first round pick; two second round picks (Minnesota)
2015
: No first round pick; one second round pick

Here is a detailed review of the pick flow:

2010 Activity
Pick No. 18: Miami’s own pick; traded to OKC in Daequan Cook trade on 6/23/10
Pick No. 32: Received from OKC in Deaquan Cook trade on 6/23/10; Dexter Pittman
Pick No. 41: Received from Toronto in Shawn Marion trade on 2/13/09; Jarvis Varnado
Pick No. 42: Received from NOH in Marcus Thornton trade on 6/25/09; Da’Sean Butler
Pick No. 48: Miami’s own pick; Latavious Williams selected and traded to Oklahoma City for 2011 second round pick

2011 Activity
First Round: Miami’s own pick; traded to Toronto (lottery protected) in Chris Bosh trade on 7/9/10
First Round: Received from Toronto (lottery protected through 2014) in Shawn Marion trade on 2/13/09; returned to Toronto in Chris Bosh trade on 7/9/10
Second Round: Miami’s own pick; traded to LA Lakers in Patrick Beverley trade on 6/25/09
Second Round: Received from Minnesota in Michael Beasley trade on 7/12/10
Second Round: Received from Oklahoma City in Latavious Williams trade on 6/24/10; traded to Cleveland in Lebron James trade on 7/9/10

2012 Activity
First Round: Miami’s own pick; swap right to Cleveland in Lebron James trade on 7/9/10
Second Round: Miami’s own pick; traded to New Jersey in Chris Quinn trade on 1/5/10
Second Round: Received from Memphis (top-55 protected) in Shaun Livingston trade on 1/7/09
Second Round: Received from New Orleans in Marcus Thornton trade on 6/25/09; traded to Cleveland in Lebron James trade on 7/9/10

2013 Activity
First Round: Miami’s own pick; traded to Cleveland in Lebron James trade on 7/9/10
Second Round: Miami’s own pick

2014 Activity
First Round: Miami’s own pick
Second Round: Miami’s own pick
Second Round: Received from Minnesota in Michael Beasley trade on 7/12/10

2015 Activity
First Round: Miami’s own pick; traded to Cleveland in Lebron James trade on 7/9/10
Second Round: Miami’s own pick

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  1. Eric
    July 13th, 2010 at 12:14 | #1

    Where did the term “top-55 protected” come from? With 30 teams in the league, that number seems like Memphis might have picked it randomly…

  2. July 13th, 2010 at 12:16 | #2

    @Eric
    Such protections are actually quite commonplace. In effect, it means the Heat are unlikely to receive the pick (and if it did, it would be a bottom five pick in the second round).

  3. CB
    July 13th, 2010 at 13:00 | #3

    This is great! Thanks! if it is protected that year, does it roll to next year and become unprotected?

  4. July 13th, 2010 at 13:03 | #4

    @CB
    It does not roll. The Heat either gets it or loses out.

  5. bo miller
    September 24th, 2010 at 21:33 | #5

    heard on tv that nba did not allow a team to trade their first round pick 2 in a row. trying to find out if that is true. heard it on espn but have not read what year they lose their 1st round pick.

    • September 24th, 2010 at 21:41 | #6

      I don’t know what it is you are referring to but your understanding is correct. Teams are restricted from trading away all of their future first round picks in consecutive years. Teams sometimes work around this rule by trading first round picks in alternate years.

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